The Remix of Love

November 15th, 2008

Never before has LOVE translated to remind people to VOTE resulting in HOPE, except in this age of design, when the past is often remixed into the context of today.

The original work by Robert Indiana entitled "LOVE", was created in the sixties at a time when the concepts of "love and peace" were leading words to help a generation get through a time of war, and look ahead to a more peaceful future. Indiana's work became a pop culture icon of the time, first as a greeting card for MoMa, then appearing on everything from postage stamps to coffee mugs, as well as three dimensional sculptures in many major cities around the world. 

Over the past six months of traveling around New York City, I sighted a wave of underground stenciling and sticker campaigns derived from Indiana's work, with the letters shifted around to read as "VOTE". This time unknown underground stencil artists targeted urban spaces to remind viewers to vote. 

Interestingly as the original design was remixed by an underground artist, Robert himself had resurrected the graphic language of his original work to support another word. This time his work responded to a frustrated state of the country in yet another straining war, "HOPE" became the next word to inspire a new generation through the political campaign of Barack Obama for president. 

The impact that four slab-serif letters can have at times when change is called for, shows the potential power of graphic design. And I think it's safe to say the recent remix designs likely had a small part in the successful election of Barack Obama by promoting positive words.

Love Remixed

Original entitled “LOVE” by Robert Indiana in 1964  Stencil of remixed design by unknown artist 2008   Sticker entitled “HOPE” by Robert Indiana in 2008

The following are photos I've taken and collected of stencils and stickers around the city.


Love Remixed


Love Remixed


Love Remixed

Love Remixed

Love Remixed

Love Remixed

Love Remixed

Love Remixed